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When to Divide Daylilies?


Pink Daylily

Daylilies are colorful, hardy, and low-maintenance perennials that add life to your flower garden. You will mostly see these perennials flourishing in USDA hardiness zones 3-10. These beautiful perennials will continue to produce buds throughout the summer, but each bloom will only last for a day or two. Daylilies are typically easy to care for, and barely require much attention. However, if you want to make sure that your daylilies are healthy, then it is a good idea to divide them now and then. Learn how and when to divide daylilies.

Best Selling Daylilies


Dividing Daylilies

You might enjoy watching your patch of daylilies grow close together in a rampant frenzy because it makes your flower garden appear more lush, dense, and full of foliage. However, as daylilies grow, their root system gets crowded and clumped together.

This proximity between plant roots enables unhealthy competition where your precious perennials begin competing against each other for nutrients and water in the same soil. Daylilies that are growing close together also cast a shadow on each other with their leaves. Shade can inhibit these perennials from being able to soak in the maximum amount of sunlight since they need full sun to thrive.

Dividing daylilies helps them grow bigger, better, and more abundant blooms. By missing out on the opportunity to divide daylilies, you are robbing them of the chance to grow their best.

Digging, dividing, and de-clumping your daylilies is the most effective means of encouraging healthy plant growth. It helps eliminate competition for shared resources such as sunlight, water, and nutrients between plants in your flower garden. It gives each perennial ample space to breathe, and an equal chance to be able to develop beautiful blooms.

Best Time to Divide Daylilies?

Ideally, you will want to divide your daylilies once every three to five years to keep them healthy. It does not matter which climate conditions you live in, the best time to divide your daylilies is during early spring season, after they have finished blooming.

The spring season is perfect because it is the time where new shoots are beginning to emerge. It is easier to divide these plants during this time as the cool soil temperatures, and showers of light rain can help newly divided and replanted daylilies recover quickly. 

When to Divide Daylily Bulbs?

It does not matter if it is a bit earlier or later in spring when you decide to divide your daylilies. The timing you choose will only influence how long it will take them to recover from their bloom later in the season. If your climate growing zone is zone 7 or above (according to the USDA), then it is a good idea to transplant your daylilies in the fall. Doing so will ensure that the scorching heat of summer has passed.

Can I Divide Daylilies in the Summer and Fall?

However, while spring may be the best time to divide your daylilies, it is essential to remember that it is not the only season when you can do this. Daylilies are exceptionally hardy perennial flowers that are easy to please, and they can stand a lot of abuse before they give up.

You can divide and plant daylilies well into late autumn without compromising the benefits of dividing your lilies. Doing so will still give your daylilies enough time to be able to develop healthy blooms during the growing season next year.

Daylilies can be divided almost any time during the year, and you can be confident that these resilient flowers will always return without disappointing you. To get the most out of dividing and transplanting your daylilies, you will want to do this once every few years.

Daylily Care

Daylilies are incredibly reliable flowers that will return year after year, without fail, even if you choose not to divide and transplant them. If you haven’t separated your daylilies yet, then remember that it is never too late! While the best time to divide them is during spring, they are tough enough to survive being divided anytime during the year.

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