Rose Bush Trees

6 products

Grow Your Own Bouquets with Our Collection of Rose Bush Trees

What’s better than receiving roses from someone you care about? Growing them yourself, of course!

Our Rose bush trees are your typical Rose bushes pruned to look like trees. Their rounded shape on top of a long stem creates a feeling of whimsy and elegance in any garden. Rose bush trees won’t get any taller than 5 feet, so they’re perfect for lining sidewalks or seating areas or placing them in flower beds with shorter plants underneath.

You can get the classic Red Double Knock Out Rose Tree which is just like the regular bush but shaped like a cute tree. The Peach Drift Rose Tree is perfect if you’re looking for soft, warm tones to add to your garden.

Rose Bush Tree Care Overview

Rose bush trees are a great addition to any garden because they stand out from other plants due to their shape and beautiful flowers. They’re drought-tolerant and resistant to diseases and pests, so they’re a no-brainer for people who want fewer challenges in the garden.

Give your Rose bush trees plenty of sunlight, and you’ll have a happy plant. They don’t require much water or pruning, and they consistently bloom from spring through summer, delighting you with color for most of the year. Some varieties will bloom through fall or even until the first frost.

Rose Bush Tree Colors

At Perfect Plants you can choose from multiple varieties of pink, white, and red rose bush trees. The Double Knock Out® rose bush trees will grow slightly larger than the Drift® roses.

How to Plant Rose Bush Trees

The best time to plant Rose bush trees is in spring after the danger of frost has passed.

Plant your Rose bush tree in a sunny location. Most varieties can tolerate partial shade, but the more sunlight they receive, the better. Roses are tolerant of many soil types, but alkaline soil will be the best option. We recommend our Rose Soil Mix because it’s tailored to Roses, so you can be sure it has the correct pH value and nutrients to make a happy plant.

Dig a hole that’s the same depth as the root ball but twice the width. Fill the hole with soil and water thoroughly to remove any air pockets. Water regularly for the tree’s first year so it can get established in your garden. After one year, you can water it less often since Roses are drought tolerant.

What is the Difference Between a Rose Bush and a Rose Tree?

Technically speaking, rose trees are not real. You won’t find any growing naturally in the world. Traditionally, roses you find will grow from a shrub with multiple branches jutting out from the base. Rose bush trees are modified plants that can grow tall like a tree from a single stem. 

How to Make a Rose Bush Into a Tree

Rose bush trees are man made plants that come from grafting a rose bush on top of a tall, sturdy stem. To graft a rose bush, you’ll first need a robust rootstock that has already been growing for some time. 

How Big Does a Rose Bush Tree Get?

Rose bush trees won’t grow more than 4 or 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide at full maturity. Most of the time, when you get a rose bush tree for sale from Perfect Plants, it will already be on its way to maturity. Your tree will only take another one or two years to reach full size.

Rose Bush Tree Zoning

The Rose bush trees can grow in USDA zones 5-10. They’re tolerant of some cold temperatures, but they won’t survive the winter in zones colder than 5. Depending on the variety and your zone, the trees may behave deciduously and lose their leaves in the winter, or they may be evergreen if it’s warm enough. All Roses will stop flowering in cold months.

How to Water Rose Bush Trees

Rose bush trees are drought tolerant, but they’ll be happier if you can keep the soil moist. Water them when the top few inches of the soil are dry. Water them more often in the hottest part of summer or during periods of drought since the soil will dry out faster. You can allow your rose bush tree to dry out entirely in winter before you water it again since it’s dormant and doesn’t require as much water.

How to Fertilize Rose Bush Trees

Give your Roses slow-release fertilizer in spring before new growth appears to encourage the plant to grow lots of blooms. Roses are heavy feeders, so the plant may benefit from extra fertilizer later in the growing season.

How to Prune A Rose Bush Tree

Pruning isn’t a requirement, but it will certainly help your Rose bush trees look their best! Remove spent flowers as they die to promote new growth and remove any branches that may grow along the main stem to keep its tree shape. Be careful not to remove branches that will have blooms while you’re pruning.

Shop Our Selection of Rose Bush Trees for Sale Today!

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